Honesty

The walk home from work is a dull one. For all the grandeur Edinburgh has in her city centre, there are as many outlying areas of anonymous suburbia. My walk passes through some of these areas, with little of interest save a small section of the Water of Leith. There on the banks, last week, I spotted a tall plant showing off its purple flowers. I didn’t recognise it and without having my plant book to hand, a quick text to my mum tells me it’s Honesty (thanks mum!).

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Excuse the terrible quality of the photo; with thanks to Wikimedia for a better quality one…

Honesty in flower
Despite Honesty’s apparent ubiquity I don’t recall noticing it before. It’s the first flower I’ve seen in bloom this year, with only the earliest of blossoming trees being out so far. As I always do, I looked it up, intrigued by any other names it goes by. I found a solitary reference to it called gealach-lus in Gaelic, meaning ‘moon plant’. I can’t find any other reference to it by that name so I presume it’s simply to correspond with the latin name, Lunaria annua. Either way, I’m quite taken by it and am looking forward, as the seasons progress, to do as my mum says: collect the dried seedheads and decorate the house with those little moons.

Honesty seedheads

Brisgean – Silverweed

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Suddenly it’s June and we’re running headfirst into Summer. The open moorland has tipped over into green after shades of brown dominated Winter. Verges and lochans are ready to burst into a song of yellow with the first flag iris in bloom. Elsewhere, silverweed lies low on the roadsides, shimmering in whatever sun it catches. It’s an unassuming plant but I’m fond of it and it has a revealing history.

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In Gaelic, many things have more than one name and silverweed is no exception. It’s common name in brisgean (breesh-kun) but it’s ’poetic’ name is An Seachdamh Aran, literally meaning ‘the 7th bread’. It has been, in the recent past, relied on in times of famine to provide much needed sustenance. The root can be ground into a kind of flour from which bread can be made.

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In the days before tatties, it was reputedly used extensively as a foodstuff, not just as a last resort. I’m not going to be digging up the verges to try it anytime soon but I’d be interested to hear if anyone has tried some.

More here by Ruaraidh MacLean for SNH.

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Into Spring

A Winter malaise seems to have gotten hold of this little corner of the internet. It feels like it’s been ongoing for months and is – amongother things – hindering my attempts to finish certain tasks. Most notably of these is a test knit I’ve been working on for a while. You can see the original project here. It’s a beautiful pattern and currently one of the only things I’m grateful to Winter for – it being cold enough to wear it.

Though I’m complaining about it, the Winter is absolutely one of my favourite seasons. I adore the crispness in the air and, for the most part, the unpredictable weather. Still, every year at this stage I’m longing for a little warmth in the sun and flowers to appear. And lo – they are!

It’s incredibly to see such vivid colour after what has felt like an eternity of grey. Long may they continue to flourish…